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Flying Model Rockets
Allen & Allen Motor Speedway Racing, LLC.
Your Business Events and Party Specialis
Phone 610-520-7247 or 610-527-1251
e-mail jallenenterprises@verizon.net
Odd'l Rockets Break Away Model Rocket Kit
What is Model Rocketry?

Scale Javelin Model Rocket Model rocketry was developed during the "space race" era as an alternative to the amateur rocket activity -- involving metallic airframes and the mixing of dangerous propellants -- that was responsible for injuring and even killing numerous young scientific experimenters.

Model rockets are constructed of much safer materials -- such as cardboard, plastic, and balsa wood -- and are fueled by single-use rocket motors manufactured by professional concerns. These rockets may be flown over and over simply by replacing the used motor with a fresh one. They typically contain a parachute, streamer, or other recovery device that allows them to land gently for later reflight. The modeler need never mix, pack, or work with explosives or propellants.

Today, model rocket kits and motors can be purchased in almost every hobby shop and toy store. Kits are designed for all ages and all levels of challenge, from simple starter kits to complicated scale models. Motor power ranges from "1/4A" (the smallest) to "G" -- enough power to lift a six-foot model and a hefty payload!

Model rockets must be flown in compliance with the Model Rocket Safety Code.
Model Rocket Safety Code


Effective August 2012

Materials. I will use only lightweight, non-metal parts for the nose, body, and fins of my rocket.
Motors. I will use only certified, commercially-made model rocket motors, and will not tamper with these motors or use them for any purposes except those recommended by the manufacturer.

Ignition System. I will launch my rockets with an electrical launch system and electrical motor igniters. My launch system will have a safety interlock in series with the launch switch, and will use a launch switch that returns to the "off" position when released.

Misfires. If my rocket does not launch when I press the button of my electrical launch system, I will remove the launcher's safety interlock or disconnect its battery, and will wait 60 seconds after the last launch attempt before allowing anyone to approach the rocket.






Launch Safety. I will use a countdown before launch, and will ensure that everyone is paying attention and is a safe distance of at least 15 feet away when I launch rockets with D motors or smaller, and 30 feet when I launch larger rockets. If I am uncertain about the safety or stability of an untested rocket, I will check the stability before flight and will fly it only after warning spectators and clearing them away to a safe distance. When conducting a simultaneous launch of more than ten rockets I will observe a safe distance of 1.5 times the maximum expected altitude of any launched rocket.
Launcher. I will launch my rocket from a launch rod, tower, or rail that is pointed to within 30 degrees of the vertical to ensure that the rocket flies nearly straight up, and I will use a blast deflector to prevent the motor's exhaust from hitting the ground. To prevent accidental eye injury, I will place launchers so that the end of the launch rod is above eye level or will cap the end of the rod when it is not in use.








Size. My model rocket will not weigh more than 1,500 grams (53 ounces) at liftoff and will not contain more than 125 grams (4.4 ounces) of propellant or 320 N-sec (71.9 pound-seconds) of total impulse.
Flight Safety. I will not launch my rocket at targets, into clouds, or near airplanes, and will not put any flammable or explosive payload in my rocket.

Launch Site. I will launch my rocket outdoors, in an open area at least as large as shown in the accompanying table, and in safe weather conditions with wind speeds no greater than 20 miles per hour. I will ensure that there is no dry grass close to the launch pad, and that the launch site does not present risk of grass fires.
Recovery System. I will use a recovery system such as a streamer or parachute in my rocket so that it returns safely and undamaged and can be flown again, and I will use only flame-resistant or fireproof recovery system wadding in my rocket.
Recovery Safety. I will not attempt to recover my rocket from power lines, tall trees, or other dangerous places.

LAUNCH SITE DIMENSIONS
Installed Total Impulse (N-sec)Equivalent Motor TypeMinimum Site Dimensions (ft.)

0.00--1.251/4A, 1/2A50
1.26--2.50A100
2.51--5.00B200
5.01--10.00C400
10.01--20.00D500
20.01--40.00E1,000
40.01--80.00F1,000
80.01--160.00G1,000
160.01--320.00Two Gs1,500
Semroc Mars Lander Model Rocket Kit
Take Your Business Events into the Clouds!
To Scullal your Business Event please us for information.

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